WE CARE ENOUGH ABOUT YOUR CHILD TO BE REGISTERED AND
LICENSED
WITH THE
STATE OF MARYLAND'S OFFICE OF CHILD CARE.

E-mail Bonnie Drayer and she will send your needs out to local providers
who may have an opening for you.

Bonnie Drayer - Child Care Lead
Coordinator/Parent Contact  
mdrayer921@aol.com

Please Include:
Name
Phone number
AND/OR Email Address
Number and Ages of children
School District or the area looking for care in.
Requested Starting Date
Days and Hours Needed
Parent's Page
Tired of calling provider after provider, only to hear
they don't have an opening for your child
?
WE ARE HERE TO HELP!
ExchangeEveryDay

Family Child Care Update
January 4, 2011
The very least you can do in your life is to figure out what you hope for. And the most you can do is live inside
that hope.
-Barbara Kingsolver

A 2007 report by the National Center for Children in Poverty, "Family Child Care in the United States," based on
a thorough review on recent research, offers these insights on family child care in the United States...

  • Nearly one-quarter of all children are in family child care at some point before beginning elementary
    school.  Furthermore, the majority of young children with working mothers are cared for in private
    homes.  

  • These children spend an average of 31 hours per week in family child care, which can include nights
    and weekends.

  • Family child care providers make up a sizeable portion of small business owners in the USA.  
    Nationally, there are a total of 213,966 licensed family child care homes, which breaks down to 166,514
    small family child care homes (serving up to six children) and 47,452 large homes (serving 7 - 12
    children).  

  • Families using home-based care (both regulated and unregulated) are more likely to prefer this care
    for infants and toddlers, but prefer preschools and centers for older children.

  • 95 percent of family child care providers are women.

  • 90 percent of family child care providers are parents themselves — about 33 percent care for their own
    children in addition to unrelated children.

  • Most family child care providers have low earnings ($15,000 to $25,000 annually for full-time care of low-
    income children) and most work long hours with little to no access to employment benefits.

  • The quality of care in family child care is not associated with the provider's age or years of experience,
    but positively correlated with the training and education the provider receives.

  • The majority of parents using family child care are satisfied with their arrangement.  Parents using
    family child care believe that their children receive more individual attention in home-based settings.
Many parents do not realize that it is actually against Maryland state law
to do child care without a license
. While there are exceptions, such as
caring for relatives, it is often much safer to choose a Licensed Child Care
Provider.

Licensed providers have background checks, finger printing, CPR, First
Aid, S
IDS training, many hours of training in several content areas, water  
safety
checks, Maryland State Fire Marshall fire inspections and much
more to
ensure your child's safety.  Please be sure that there is a license
number listed in advertisements anytime you are looking for care.  If not,
you are leaving your child in an unlicensed home.  Looking for that license
number is for your child's safety and
The Calvert County Family Daycare Association will help you find care in
one of their many licensed homes.  Just call
or email our Child Care Lead
Coordinator, Bonnie Drayer and she
will put your needs out to the nearly  
100
licensed providers in the county.

We are not babysitters, we are Licensed, Trained, Registered Child Care
Providers
.